Posts Tagged ‘golf clubs for sale’

Which one do you prefer, TaylorMade SLDR Irons or R11 irons?

TaylorMade now makes available the R11 irons and SLDR Irons. Let’s take a brief look at some new Taylormade R11 irons for sale incorporate the “precision weighting port” TaylorMade first used in its forged irons, the red “badge” visible in the photo above. This weight, positioned during assembly, is used to maintain a uniform swingweight as well as to position the center of gravity in the center of the face from toe to heel on each iron.

The soles of the R11 irons change a bit through the set, with the long irons using wider soles to lower the CG and increase the MOI; the mid- and short irons have soles that TaylorMade calls “moderately thin.” The long irons also differ in being larger, although the toplines aren’t as thick as in many oversized irons. The shorter irons are more compact with “moderately sharp” leading edges.

Also new in the SLDR family from TaylorMade is Taylormade sldr irons. TaylorMade says the target audience for the SLDR irons are golfers who want a classic clubhead shape, size and finish, but with more distance.

The technology increases launch angle, the company says, with a higher ball flight, longer carry, and steep descent. A polymer that fills the Speed Pocket, combined with a vibration-absorbing badge in the cavityback, help with sound and feel. The SLDR irons have narrow soles and thin toplines.

Shaft options are the KBS Tour C-Taper 90 steel shaft and Fujikura graphite. The stock grip is Golf Pride Tour Velvet.

TaylorMade’s NEW SLDR fairway wood and SLDR hybrid

Many golfers know, TaylorMade company has definited fairway wood and hybrid as the SLDR name. But do you know the SLDR stands for “slider.” The golfers can slide a weight, changing its position to affect shot shape.

The TaylorMade SLDR Fairway Wood and rescues have silver clubfaces that contrast with the charcoal-gray crowns; shallow faces and more traditional shaping. They also come with TaylorMade’s Loft-Sleeve technology; the stated loft can be adjusted up or down by as much as 1.5 degrees. They have a “speed pocket” behind the face to increase face flexibility.

They also come with TaylorMade’s Loft-Sleeve technology; the stated loft can be adjusted up or down by as much as 1.5 degrees. In a new approach, that pocket is filled with a polymer to keep turf debris from filling in the gap.

Unlike the TaylorMade SLDR Driver, the weight on the SLDR fairway and Hybrid do not slide, it is stationary. Still, like with the driver, the weight is positioned forward on the sole (closer to the clubface) for a low-and-forward center of gravity position.

The SLDR fairways come in lofts of 14, 15, 17, 19 and 21 degrees; and the TaylorMade SLDR Hybrid comes in lofts of 17, 19, 21 and 24 degrees.

Taylormade SLDR Irons and r11 irons are very amazing

The SLDR name has been synonymous with TaylorMade’s Loft Up metalwoods message. They say the Taylormade SLDR Irons is for the “players who want the best of both worlds”. They believe the cavity-back, speed slot iron offers a traditional size and shape with the best of TaylorMade’s modern technology.

With a deep, undercut cavity behind the thin face and the ThruSlot cutting entirely through the clubhead, TaylorMade believe the SLDR irons create even more flex and speed at impact.  SLDR irons may look like game improvement clubs, but TaylorMade have given the irons a modern, yet traditional shape to appeal to mid and low handicappers as well. The thin sole and slim topline give the SLDR irons better-player playability and looks.

Like TaylorMade SLDR Driver for sale, TaylorMade have taken measures to ensure the SLDR irons produce a soft feel and sound. The SLDR iron’s classically shaped and sized clubhead has universal visual appeal. It incorporates our new SpeedPocket with ThruSlot Technology, which produces fast ball speed and high launch across the face for distance and consistency, while also promoting soft feel and sound.

TaylorMade R11 Irons is tuned to perfection. The ball went on a nice medium high trajectory and the feel right across the face was lovely. With the centre of gravity rising through the set, even the long-irons are a joy to hit and better players may choose to stick with these rather than go for a hybrid.

They are very forgiving on mis-hits, although this forgiveness makes shaping the ball a little harder if you are trying for small fades or draws. Bigger movements in shot shape are easier, so the shot shapers among you may prefer the taylormade speedblade irons. Around the fairways and greens they have the feel off confidence. The heads are larger than a typical players club. These are geared for scratch to 20 handicaps, so they will be larger than others.

These irons are a lot of fun to play. You feel like you can go after it and hammer the ball with great results. From the performance to the stylish looks the TaylorMade R11 is a ‘must try’ set of irons for low to mid handicap golfers.

Control Trajectory by Varying Golf Ball Position

One of the many things that set tour pros apart from amateurs – even very good ones – is the ability to control the ball’s trajectory.

This is an important factor in windy conditions, but also when playing to different pin placements with TaylorMade Tour Preferred CB Irons 2014, carrying distant hazards or hitting a shot that runs after landing.

There’s no real magic to altering the height of your shots. It’s largely done by changing the ball’s position in your stance, which determines the club’s effective loft at impact. As a simple rule, the farther up in your stance you play the ball  with TaylorMade SLDR Driver for sale – toward the left foot, for a right-hander – the higher it will fly. Play it farther back, or to the right, to produce a lower flight.

It’s important to keep the hands ahead of the ball and the shaft leaning toward the target on iron shots. The farther back you play the ball, the more the shaft will lean.

Ramsay’s TaylorMade Tour Preferred MC irons and R11s driver

The 29-year-old Scot, who claimed his first victory since landing the 2009 South African Open, carded a 16-under winning total at the idyllic Crans-sur-Sierre for his second career professional victory.

Ramsay, who has finished in the top-six in his last two starts, trusted the r11s driver taylormade, RocketBallz Tour fairway woods, TaylorMade Tour Preferred MC Irons 2014 and Penta TP5 ball to conquer the cold, damp conditions in the Swiss Alps.

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The former US Amateur champion performed admirably with his TaylorMade Tour Preferred Forged MC irons by topping the greens in regulation charts for the week on 81.9%.

TaylorMade claims its Tour Preferred MC irons incorporate a compact, shallow cavity that delivers the optimum blend of feel, workability and forgiveness.

Ramsay, who strolled home in the comfort of the adidas Golf adiPURE, also ranked in the top-20 for driving accuracy with his TaylorMade R11S.

The Aberdonian also took advantage of Under Armour’s Storm collection to battle the elements.

“The conditions the first few days made it difficult for everyone but I feel like Under Armour equipped me with all the right tools to keep my performance levels up even in such terrible conditions,” said Ramsay, who relied on the Storm 2.0 Zip Jacket, Storm 2.0 Pant and Evo Coldgear Compression mock.

TaylorMade introduces new RocketBladez irons

It is the performance, not the looks, that motivated TaylorMade president and CEO Mark King to call TaylorMade RocketBladez sale a “once in a lifetime innovation.”

The TaylorMade RocketBladez Irons also featured a slot cut into the sole, but the new model’s Speed Pocket is 3 millimeters longer. It’s also slightly wider and extends back in the heel and toe areas. TaylorMade says this updated design allows the clubface to flex more effectively at impact, broadening the sweetspot. The result? Golf balls hit across a larger portion of the hitting area fly about the same distance for more consistency, according to the company.

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Sean O’Hair was the first to test them on the PGA Tour, and he said, “These irons will make me a better player.” It is clear that TaylorMade officials and players have great expectations for the RocketBladez. These irons, even the Tour model, are made of cast stainless steel and not forged steel. TaylorMade calls this “one-piece cast construction.” Executive vice president Sean Toulon said in this case virtually nobody can tell the difference between cast and forged.

The clubface is made of maraging stainless steel and incorporates the company’s newest iteration of Inverted Cone Technology, which is designed to deliver two primary benefits: an increase in the size of the clubface area that delivers high ball speed and an improvement in the control of the angle of the ball as it leaves the clubface, for straighter shots and tighter dispersion.

At last, TaylorMade engineers say they found a way to fine-tune the Center of Gravity in the RocketBladez to a low and “absolutely centered” location on the face by redistributing weight it took from the top of the club, as well as the hosel, to strategic areas within the clubhead.

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Enjoy TaylorMade’s highly successful R11s driver

The R11S is the follow up to the wildly successful R11. It features a flat-white crown color and black PVD face to improve alignment and accuracy off the tee.

The taylormade r11s driver’s modern-classical clubhead shape is intended to suit the eye of better players, while still providing ample forgiveness and confidence for average players. The head boasts a contemporary, slightly more triangular appearance than traditionally shaped drivers that provides higher MOI and a deeper, farther-forward CG position.

The R11s has a unique feel that struck me right away as different. It’s got a really nice, deep feel at impact. I can best describe it as the feeling of hitting a baseball with a wooden bat. It’s solid, and when you catch it on the screws the ball simply explodes. The sound is quite different than the high pitched ding of many drivers on the market, although for some reason the sound didn’t quite match up with the feel, sounding a tad more high pitched than I would have expected.

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For me personally, the R11s was longer than any of the three drivers I had been rotating through my bag at the time. The ability to tinker with face angle, lie angle and weighting in the head is helpful, although be careful that you don’t obsess over it. I found an absolutely measurable difference from one end of the spectrum to the r11 irons, but even as a low single digit handicapper, once I got into the general ballpark of how I wanted my settings, I found that my swing and ball flight day to day were slightly different enough that I’d quickly wonder if the settings needed to be changed.

Instead of instilling confidence and learning to play with the club, I consistently found myself wanting to tinker and play around with it. If there’s a downside to so much adjustability, the endless second guessing is it. My primary gripe with the R11s is in my ability to swing it consistently. I chalk this up to its slightly longer length, which promotes distance but can rob you of the ability to control it. I found that my primary miss was a high, weak push or an uncharacteristic 60-yard slice.

The R11s is so popular on Tour and in the stores because it’s a great stick. The white head is a plus and you’ll have a hard time finding a better stock shaft on the market.

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The Adjustable Taylormade R11S Driver and R1 Driver

Taylormade R11S Driver is the modify model of R11 Driver. Taylormade R11S is the most advanced driver till now, the while shape is very nice.

The 460cc driver – available in three lofts, 9-, 10.5- and 12-degrees for right-handers – features a 3-degree Flight Control Technology (FCT) sleeve and annew 5-way adjustable sole plate (ASP) creating a golfer’s preferred set-up as they look down at the club at address. Combined with TaylorMade’s Movable Weight Technology (MWT), the R11S driver can be tuned for upto 80 separate launch settings.

“The R11S is a golfer’s dream come true; it’s the realisation of every ounce of innovation, adjustability, and performance we could package in a bigger, more aerodynamic, white clubhead,” said Sean Toulon, executive vice president. “With the proper fitting, we know golfers of all skill levels will be longer and straighter off the tee.”

”Offering a wide range of loft settings is imperative, because our research indicates that 80 percent of golfers are playing the wrong loft, which costs them distance,” said TaylorMade Chief Technical Officer Benoit Vincent. ”The TaylorMade R1 Driver for sale offers 12 positions to help golfers find the loft that delivers the launch conditions that deliver maximum distance.”

That stat – that 80 percent of golfers don’t play the correct loft – seems incredible, but TaylorMade says that many of us typically choose the wrong loft when we buy a driver off the rack. We usually opt for too little loft because too many of us believe that a lower-lofted driver will provide longer distance, but that typically costs the average player carry and distance by promoting a too-low launch angle.

The R1’s 12 loft settings mean it can be set anywhere from 8 degrees to 12 degrees of loft (seven of the settings are at the standard lie angle, and five at an upright lie angle). The seven face-angle settings include: neutral/square, slightly open, more open, maximum open, slightly closed, more closed and maximum closed. And the two shot-shape weights allow the Center of Gravity to be shifted by five millimeters to promote either a draw or a neutral/straight trajectory.

How to Warm Up for a Round of Golf?

Try to arrive at the course with plenty of time before teeing off. About an hour should suffice. Plan to spend 20-30 minutes on the driving range and another 10-20 minutes on the putting and chipping green.

If you’ve taken lessons, jot down a few notes detailing what you’ve learned. For example, your instructor may have emphasized proper alignment, stance width or posture. Focus on these elements with each practice shot.

On the range, you don’t need to practice with every club. Choose a couple of short irons, a mid-iron or two, a Taylormade R11 Rescue Hybrid or TaylorMade SLDR Fairway Wood, and the TaylorMade R11S Driver. Start by hitting several shots with your shortest club (a sand wedge, for example). Then switch to the next longest longer club, and so on until you reach the driver.

Moving from short clubs to long ones will help you establish a smooth tempo so that once you’ve got the driver in hand, you’ll be less likely to overswing. Shorter clubs are also easier to strike well, building confidence from the start.

Make sure not to overdo it on the range. Until you’re playing and practicing regularly, your golf muscles will tire fairly quickly. Hit 20-30 balls and move on to the green.

Begin your putting session from very close range – no more than a couple of feet from the cup. The idea, again, is to ingrain fundamentals and build confidence. Most importantly, try to accelerate the putter through the ball.

After you’ve made 10-15 short ones, move a few feet out and hit another 6-8 putts. Work your way out to about 15 feet, then finish with a few putts from long distance (30-40 feet). By the time you’re done, you should have a good feel for the pace of putts you’ll see on the course.

If the club has a practice green for chipping, spend a few minutes there working on very basic shots. Focus on hitting your chips with a downward strike for crisp contact.

Which one do you prefer, TaylorMade SLDR or SLDR White Driver?

Now with the discount Taylormade SLDR driver, the moveable weights in the heel and toe and the dial on the sole have been replaced with a single sliding weight in the 460cc titanium head.

The TaylorMade SLDR driver succeeds the TaylorMade R1 driver and there are a lot of significant changes from the previous model. This reduces the weight of the SLDR driver and makes it lighter so that in theory you get more clubhead speed from the same amount of effort. They have also moved the centre of gravity (CG) closer to the face which also increases ball speed, although this can also increase dispersion and reduce accuracy.

Although it is showing a gain of only 3 yards in total distance, the average distance shown with the SLDR hides a couple of 280 yard shots so the theory does work in practice. Using a 9.5° driver adjusted up a degree to 10.5° slightly closes the face to make it more forgiving than the 9.5° or even the standard 10.5° model for me. Weird, but it works as the dispersion view of the trackman backed this up with a much tighter pattern for these shots too.

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From a technical standpoint, the Taylormade SLDR White driver is identical to the original SLDR. It has a 460cc head; an adjustable 12-position hosel mechanism that can increase or decrease the club’s stated loft by up to 1.5 degrees; and a 20-gram weight that can be affixed into 21 positions to create a draw or a fade bias.

According to TaylorMade, the SLDR’s low and forward center of gravity (CG) position lowers spin and creates more ball speed. To maximize distance, TaylorMade recommends golfers play with more loft to achieve the coveted high-launch, low-spin launch condition that can maximize distance.

One of the benefits over the white driver was the alignment aid it created between the white crown and white face. On the SLDR driver, TaylorMade have reversed this and you have a charcoal grey crown and a silver face giving you the same effect, even if it is not quite as pronounced.

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