Archive of ‘TaylorMade RBZ’ category

Manage Yardages with Taylormade RBZ clubs

TaylorMade Golf has long been noted for being aggressive and innovative in their marketing efforts. And their newest Taylormade RBZ has certainly drawn notice as being.

Technology and design have merged to create a Taylormade RBZ irons that delivers more swing speed than ever before – say our friends at TaylorMade Golf. More distance in every club, from the 3-iron to the lob wedge, these new irons have earned their name. Engineered with metalwood construction and fast-flexing faces. Attack from anywhere with maximum ball speed and pinpoint accuracy. Get distance so extreme it’s laughable.

The Loft Sleeve Technology in the new Taylormade RBZ Stage 2 driver. The sleeve has been updated to adjust to 12 positions within the window of 1.5 degrees of loft adjustment. The driver is available in either a 9.5, 10.5 or 13 degree model, and with the Loft Sleeve Technology, offers up to 60 yards of side to side adjustability.

TaylorMade have moved the CG further forward and lower than the previous Taylormade RBZ driver. They found that a lower, further forward CG promotes a faster ball speed along with a higher launch, perfect for more distance. The crown thickness now varies from 0.6mm to 0.4mm. This process saved three grams of weight, making the clubhead even faster through impact.

Though not as adjustable as TaylorMade R1 driver, the RBZ Stage 2 has been updated to offer 12 different lofts, lie angles and face angles within the window of a 1.5-degree loft adjustment. It also includes a Thick-thin Crown design in which various portions of the crown range from 0.6 to 0.4 millimeter thick, saving three grams of weight as compared to the crowns of the 2012 R11S and RocketBallz Tour drivers.

All together the RBZ Stage 2 weighes under 300g. Combine that a slightly higher swing weight, and the design of the club, and the RBZ Stage 2 works to create a moderate draw bias.

TaylorMade introduces new RocketBladez irons

It is the performance, not the looks, that motivated TaylorMade president and CEO Mark King to call TaylorMade RocketBladez sale a “once in a lifetime innovation.”

The TaylorMade RocketBladez Irons also featured a slot cut into the sole, but the new model’s Speed Pocket is 3 millimeters longer. It’s also slightly wider and extends back in the heel and toe areas. TaylorMade says this updated design allows the clubface to flex more effectively at impact, broadening the sweetspot. The result? Golf balls hit across a larger portion of the hitting area fly about the same distance for more consistency, according to the company.

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Sean O’Hair was the first to test them on the PGA Tour, and he said, “These irons will make me a better player.” It is clear that TaylorMade officials and players have great expectations for the RocketBladez. These irons, even the Tour model, are made of cast stainless steel and not forged steel. TaylorMade calls this “one-piece cast construction.” Executive vice president Sean Toulon said in this case virtually nobody can tell the difference between cast and forged.

The clubface is made of maraging stainless steel and incorporates the company’s newest iteration of Inverted Cone Technology, which is designed to deliver two primary benefits: an increase in the size of the clubface area that delivers high ball speed and an improvement in the control of the angle of the ball as it leaves the clubface, for straighter shots and tighter dispersion.

At last, TaylorMade engineers say they found a way to fine-tune the Center of Gravity in the RocketBladez to a low and “absolutely centered” location on the face by redistributing weight it took from the top of the club, as well as the hosel, to strategic areas within the clubhead.

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Close your eyes to make more putts

Years ago, I played in the Heather Farr Charity for the Blind tournament in Sun City, Ariz. I played with an English gentleman who had been blind since birth. It was quite fascinating to watch him play, especially when he was preparing to hit a shot. His wife would walk him to the ball and help him set his club to the ball. He would then slide his hand down the shaft of the taylormade r1 driver to feel the distance from the ball. It was an amazing thing to watch, and really opened my eyes to all the tools we as golfers have to improve our feel. There are many senses we often take for granted.

While the Englishman did this routine for all his shots, he did something a little different with his putting that I think is something we all can learn from. I noticed that instead of walking him directly to the golf ball, the Englishman’s wife would take him to the hole and let him walk backward toward the direction of his ball for about five or six steps, then proceed to set up to the ball. After about four holes, I asked him why he would walk backward from the hole and what this did for his putting.

He explained to me that it allowed him to feel the way the green was sloped close to the hole and he could only feel it when he walked backward as it would move his body as he walked. It was amazing how close he came to the hole with his putts. He shot a 92 with taylormade rocketbladez irons that day, much to do with his ability to putt!

I have not only used this method to “see” which way the ball will break to the hole for my own game, but have passed it along to many of my students. The reason why the golfer only needs to walk back about five or six steps from the hole is that the ball is slowing down at this point and will be most affected by the slope of the green then.

The next time out on the putting green, try this little exercise. Stand facing the hole, then walk backward, allowing your body to follow the slope of the green. If you feel yourself going downhill to the right, you’ll know that you’ll be putting uphill from left to right because you’re putting in the opposite direction that you’re walking. If you have a tough time seeing or feeling any slope, you can try closing your eyes. You’ll begin to notice the subtle breaks and make more putts every time.

Pitch out of thick rough

Let’s set the scene for those that might have missed it. Tiger Woods, trailing by one at the time, had just hit his TaylorMade Burner 2.0 Irons shot on the par 3 16th into perhaps the worst spot he could. Into the thick rough over the green on the right, a chip that came up short would stay in the rough, a chip hit too hard would fly down the ridge and perhaps into the water. His lie was not good and if he wanted to have any chance to win, he needed to save par – something that seemed unlikely from his predicament.

Well, the skeptics were right – sort of. Tiger did not make par. He took a mighty swing that resulted in the prettiest, softest pitch that just landed on the green and started to roll towards the pin. Incredibly similar to Tiger’s famous Masters chip on the 16th at Augusta National, this chip seemd as if it might stop or just miss right before dropping in for what may have been the loudest birdie in Muirfield Village history.

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So how do you hit this shot with your TaylorMade RocketBladez Irons? You’ve probably hit it many times actually, just most likely out of a bunker. Yes, the same technique that you’d use to get out of a bunker, you should use to hit the soft high flop out of thick rough.

There are three main points to remember:

1. Set the ball forward in your stance, open the clubface. Just like a bunker shot, you want to hit slightly behind the ball and use the rough as a springboard to gently pop the ball out.
2. On the backswing, keep a quiet lower body. Most amateurs struggly with this, often straitening up in the back swing and shifting their low point of the swing. If you get too steep, you will slide right under the ball and the ball will not go far enough.
3. Fire through on your swing, maintain your spine angle, and fully rotate your hips. Watch Tiger’s body as he finishes the swing. Notice how his belt buckle finishes to the left of the target line.

The goal here is get the ball on the putting surface, hopefully with a makeable putt. If you can get it close, that’s an added bonus. If you can make it, well, that’s Tiger-esque. But it certainly doesn’t have to mean a big number. Play it like a bunker shot, commit to the swing and watch the ball float softly onto the green.

 

TaylorMade R11S driver versus RBZ Stage 2 Driver Review

The 460cc TaylorMade R11S driver – available in three lofts, 9-, 10.5- and 12-degrees for right-handers – features a 3-degree Flight Control Technology (FCT) sleeve and annew 5-way adjustable sole plate (ASP) creating a golfer’s preferred set-up as they look down at the club at address.

The R11S is a golfer’s dream come true. ASP technology – a raised five-point plate which can be rotated and secured – allows the golfer to adjust face angle independent of loft setting which means the face angle can be adjusted independently to the loft and vice versa – neutral, slightly open, open, slightly closed and closed.

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TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 Driver is the new crown alignment decals. Combining the new 4,100mm black clubface, the new decals have been developed in accordance with Dr. Steve Hitzeman, Professor of Sports Optometry. Using their own MAT-T (Motion Analysis Technology by TaylorMade) system, TaylorMade engineers carefully positioned the layout of the new decals to create effective visual cues for alignment.

The sleeve has been updated to adjust to 12 positions within the window of 1.5 degrees of loft adjustment. The driver is available in either a 9.5, 10.5 or 13 degree model, and with the Loft Sleeve Technology, offers up to 60 yards of side to side adjustability. They found that a lower, further forward CG promotes a faster ball speed along with a higher launch, perfect for more distance.

All together the RBZ Stage 2 weighes under 300g. Combine that a slightly higher swing weight, and the design of the club, and the RBZ Stage 2 works to create a moderate draw bias.

Jessica Korda wins second 2014 title

Jessica Korda won the Airbus LPGA Classic on Sunday for her second victory of the year, birdieing four of the last five holes to break out of a tight pack.

Korda made a breaking 15-foot birdie putt on the par-4 18th for a 7-under 65 and a one-stroke victory over Anna Nordqvist.

Also the winner in the season-opening event in the Bahamas, Korda played the back nine in 6-under 30 to finish at 20-under 268 on The Crossings course at the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail’s Magnolia Grove complex.

“It just sets up great for my game,” said Korda, who shot 20 under last year and tied for second. “I can be aggressive. I can read the greens. My confidence just was rising every single day. I just love it here. I love Alabama, I love this golf course, and hopefully we’ll have this tournament for a very, very long time.”

Nordqvist also birdied the 18th and finished with a 69.

Michelle Wie, 18-year-old Charley Hull and 44-year-old Catriona Matthew tied for third at 18 under. Wie and Hull shot 67 with TaylorMade SLDR Driver, and Matthew had a 69.

Wie played alongside Korda and Hull.

“I love playing with Korda,” Wie said. “It’s also really great playing with Charley as well, too. You feel old but it was a lot of fun.”

Wie, the winner last month in Hawaii, has seven top-10 finishes in 10 starts this year.

“I knew I needed a low score,” Wie said. “I got hot starting on and just didn’t quite get it together on the back nine, but still I shot 5 under today and there’s really nothing I can do. I’m just really happy for Korda. I had a lot of fun playing with her and I knew I needed a low number and I just didn’t hit it low enough with Taylormade RocketBallz Stage 2 Fairway Wood.”

Taylormade RocketBallz Stage 2 Driver with Crown Alignment Decals

As we all know, Taylormade RocketBallz Stage 2 Driver was introduced. It combines a lower and more forward CG location, a more aerodynamic head shape and an expansive, 4,100 square millimeter club face to promote up to nine more yards for better players.

The RBZ Stage 2 driver’s huge and deep clubface (4,100) gives the golfer more area to look at, which inspires confidence to swing faster and more freely for more distance. According to Dr. Steve Hitzeman, Professor of Sports Optometry at the University of Indiana, the additional linear reference features on the RBZ Stage 2 crown benefit golfers by providing additional visual cues for alignment.

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Designing the linear reference features was complicated, as we had to manage parallax as well as the rounded surface geometry of typical metalwoods. We used our MAT-T (Motion Analysis Technology by TaylorMade) System to define the visual angular range for most golfers using typical metalwoods’ lengths and lie angles. This produced a visual reference angle of approximately 70° from the ground for metalwoods.

The combination of a longer, lighter (50-gram) Fujikura RocketFuel shaft and light grip enabled TaylorMade to keep RBZ Stage 2 under 300 grams of total club weight. That, along with balancing the club to a slightly higher swing weight, allows the RBZ Stage 2 driver to promote faster swing speed for most golfers.

The Thick-thin Crown design employed in the RBZ Stage 2 driver ranges from 0.6 to 0.4 mm thick, allowing TaylorMade engineers to save three grams versus the 0.6 mm Thick-thin Crown previously incorporated in the TaylorMade R11s Driver and best price taylormade sldr driver.

PGA Tour professional to play RocketBladez irons

TaylorMade took a deep breath during the PGA Tour’s off week, and kicked off BMW Championship Week on Monday night with an event to take the wraps off its latest creation – Taylormade SpeedBlade irons.

The SpeedBlades continue the TaylorMade trend of cutting Speed Pockets into their clubheads, as found in such clubs as the Taylormade RocketBladez irons and RocketBallz woods. The Speed Pocket is a deep slot that runs from heel to toe on the sole just behind the clubface that allows the face to flex and rebound faster.

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The secret of the RocketBladez’ success is their Speed Pocket, a narrow slot cut in the sole of the 3-iron through 7-iron that permits the face to flex farther and more easily upon impact, particularly when a golfer hits the ball low on the face. The improved flex, says TaylorMade, promotes increased springiness up to the USGA limit for high ball speed. In fact, TaylorMade says, these irons are as hot as many drivers, and could help most golfers add two to five yards per shot.

Higher-lofted clubs like the sand wedge and lob wedge don’t include the Speed Pocket, but have redesigned cavities to improve their feel, and feature TaylorMade’s ATV (All-Terrain Versatility) sole for improved workability around the greens. In addition, these clubs come equipped with heavier steel shafts to promote better rhythm and control in shorter swings.

That, TaylorMade says, increases ball speed and elevates the launch angle to boost distance, and provides more control because shots land on a steep angle. In addition, TaylorMade lowered the SpeedBlade’s center of gravity to further increase the launch angle and to put more power behind shots hit low on the clubface – which the company says happens almost three-quarters of the time.

Laird is first to win with RocketBallz Stage 2 Driver

With his two-shot victory at the Valero Texas Open, Martin Laird became the first golfer to win on the PGA Tour using TaylorMade RBZ Stage 2 Driver.

Stage 2 usage on the PGA Tour could exceed that of R1. The center of gravity has been moved lower and forward, and the entire clubhead is more aerodynamic this year. It looks different. It looks powerful. The stock shaft is the 50-gram Fujikura RocketFuel, and TaylorMade confirms that this light shaft, combined with the mass properties of the driver, will create a moderate draw bias for consumers.

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Optimizing performance through adjustability is a huge theme with the TaylorMade R1 Driver. The torque wrench, used to make adjustments, is quickly becoming a staple in the golf bag. There is no loft number stamped on the clubhead. That’s because every R1 driver can be adjusted for loft between 8.5 and 12.5 degrees. The R1 also has seven face angle positions. It’s a huge deal that the driver allows loft and face angle to be adjusted independently of one another. Lie angle also can be changed.

RBZ Stage 2 driver is the new crown alignment decals. Combining the new 4,100mm black clubface, the new decals have been developed in accordance with Dr. Steve Hitzeman, Professor of Sports Optometry. Using their own MAT-T (Motion Analysis Technology by TaylorMade) system, TaylorMade engineers carefully positioned the layout of the new decals to create effective visual cues for alignment.

Whilst the design of the crown may demand a lot of attention, inside the crown TaylorMade made even more upgrades. The crown thickness now varies from 0.6mm to 0.4mm (previously a consistent 0.6mm on the R11S and RocketBallz Tour drivers). This process saved three grams of weight, making the clubhead even faster through impact.

Combine that a slightly higher swing weight, and the design of the club, and the RBZ Stage 2 driver australia works to create a moderate draw bias.

These Taylormade Fairway Woods are customized for your game

In recent years the evolution of the fairway wood has been nothing short of staggering. The fairways are now firmly in the mind of many amateurs.

The first club that came to mind is Taylormade RocketBallz Stage 2 Fairway Wood. The redesigned Stage 2, with its shallower face and lower head profile, along with a low and forward CG, helps launch the golf ball higher and makes it easier to hit. Many people said they could see themselves using the Stage 2 exclusively off the tee for those narrow holes where accuracy is at a premium.

Digging into this 17+10 claim a little further showed that for better players, or those with a ball speed of 150 mph, the Stage 2 fairway wood can produce up to 10 more yards – on top of the 17 more they were seeing out of the original Taylormade RocketBallz rbz fairway wood.  I didn’t have the original RBZ and launch monitor testing showed that my ball speed with the Stage 2 was at 148.1, just shy of the 150 needed to tap into that full claim.  The distance I was seeing was still quite impressive.

The SLDR line is no different with its metallic charcoal crown, brushed sole, and blue accents. The TaylorMade SLDR Fairway Wood is possibly the best looking fairway wood that TaylorMade has released in years. It is a sizeable difference for sure. The benefit to this is that the profile of the SLDR looks more like a fairway wood and less like a miniature driver, a definite improvement by many people’s standards.

Additionally, the Speed-Pocket is much different than we have become accustomed to as it is smaller and a slightly different shape. Put all of this together and the SLDR fairway wood is an impressive package. One area where the low spin affected trajectory more was off of the deck. In its standard 15-degree setting, the ball flight was definitely lower and more penetrating, but after adjusting the Loft Sleeve the ball flight off of the deck became higher and more consistent.

The Taylormade R11S fairway wood employs pull-face construction to create a thin, light, fast clubface that promotes high ball speed. The crown and walls are made using our Ultra-Thin Wall (UTW) casting process to reach 0.6 mm at their thinnest point. The thin crown weighs less, and that weight is used to move the CG position forward. This forward location increases ball speed by reducing dynamic loft and creating better launch conditions.

R11S fairways are standard length (3-wood / 43.5”) and equipped with Aldila RIP Phenom 70 shaft, a 70-gram shaft designed with a medium-firm tip profile. RIP shafts incorporate reverse inter-laminar material layup to more stability at impact. This package delivers more distance and control without the harsh feel associated with some firmer tip shafts.

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